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Vibrato Wars

Judith Malafronte

Many people think a peace treaty was signed after the vibrato wars of the 1970s, when the plush string textures of the modern symphony orchestra were challenged by the leaner sound of historical instruments. Eliminating vibrato, along with playing on gut strings, was the most noticeable mark of historically informed performance style. Before it was even called HIP, employing “authentic instruments” set early-music players apart from symphony orchestras, and singing with a pristine, boy-like sound marked a new vocal coloring.

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If it’s Monday, it’s Collegium

By Debra Nagy

“For some reason during tonight’s rehearsal everything I have to do in the next few weeks finally sunk in. From November 10 to 23: 5 performances, 5 instruments, 4 styles, 3 pitches, and 2 time zones. I love my job, but the universe owes me a beer.” My initial response was, “only 2 time zones?”

Johns Chapel

Cracking a Centuries-Old Tradition

By Ross W. Duffin

A prof from Ohio guides collegiate singers in Cambridge, England, in the illuminating tuning system known as Just Intonation.

John Mark Rozendaal

Viola da Gamba Dojo

By Tina Chancey

John Mark Rozendaal combines Eastern and Western teaching techniques to introduce the viol to a wide range of learners.

Early Music America

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