Reviews by the editorial staff of Early Music America. Have a new CD or book? Submit it for consideration.


CD Review: Yi-heng Yang, free-spirited on fortepiano

CD Review: Yi-heng Yang, free-spirited on fortepiano

By
Steven Silverman
Yi-Heng Yang's latest recording on the fortepiano covers three early Romantic composers: Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Robert Schumann and Franz Schubert. She makes the case for the music, but equally for use of the fortepiano in this repertoire.
CD Review: The Lonely Life of Baroque Pastiche

CD Review: The Lonely Life of Baroque Pastiche

By
Anne E. Johnson
It's fascinating to see how artists responded to pandemic lockdowns. Violinist Martin Davids' clever project takes Baroque pastiche into new realms, stitching together movements from various composers.
CD Review: Masterful Music for Two

CD Review: Masterful Music for Two

By
Karen Cook
The Flanders Recorder Duo, exacting in technique and joyful in expression, explore two-part repertoire from across the centuries, going back to the 13th century and as fresh as a world premiere.
A Vivid New Life of Beethoven

A Vivid New Life of Beethoven

By
Valerie Walden
Jan Caeyers’ expertise with both the social history of the composer’s world and the music of the period makes this an important addition to the Beethoven literature. Told with almost operatic drama, the book tells us much that we did not know, adding to our understanding and appreciation of this pivotal figure in musical history.
A New François Couperin Edition, of Music in a Life

A New François Couperin Edition, of Music in a Life

By
Mark Kroll
With this new publication of François Couperin's celebrated 'Pièces de clavecin' (Book III) together with his 'Concerts royaux,' we now have a chance to compare the keyboard composer with the chamber musician in a single volume. The introduction alone is invaluable scholarship on this period of the composer's life and world.
CD Review: Rewarding Music for Virginal on a c. 1590 Instrument

CD Review: Rewarding Music for Virginal on a c. 1590 Instrument

By
Steven Silverman
Performer-scholar Charles Metz’s 2021 valuable recording includes English virginal music by William Tisdale, plus 16 works by other late 16th-century English composers. The lovely instrument, mostly preserved, dates to c. 1590.
CD Review: Cellist Elinor Frey Explores Early Italian Concertos

CD Review: Cellist Elinor Frey Explores Early Italian Concertos

By
Andrew J. Sammut
A champion of under-performed 18-century treasures for cello, Elinor Frey's latest recording is high in virtuosity and appeal. As the cover suggests, she has two instruments at her disposal: one a standard Strad-model cello, the other a 3/4 size cello that allows several of the works to really sing.
Book Review: Exploring a Missing Link in Medieval English Motets

Book Review: Exploring a Missing Link in Medieval English Motets

By
John Ahern
Two damaged fragments of parchment, circa 1300, have an amazing story to tell. The Dorset rotulus, a scroll of music, helps flesh out a 400-year gap in our knowledge, adding new insights into the development of the medieval English motet. And for anyone looking for new early English material available for performance, the book will be an excellent resource.
CD Review: Where Singers Are Their Own Accompanists for Expressive Power

CD Review: Where Singers Are Their Own Accompanists for Expressive Power

By
Karen Cook
This fantastic new disc, the Concerto di Margherita's debut recording, includes an array of madrigals, arias, and villanelles for two to five voices, interspersed with instrumental works. The quality of the vocal production throughout is top-notch, and it is matched by that of the instruments, which shine as much in their various accompanying roles as in the standalone instrumental works.
Book Review: New Perspectives on Music and Jewish Culture in Italy

Book Review: New Perspectives on Music and Jewish Culture in Italy

By
Joshua R. Jacobson
This insightful and well-researched collection of 10 essays shed light on Jewish musical activity in the Italian peninsula from the 14th to the 17th centuries. Unique to this time and place was an efflorescence of musical activity—in the sense of European “high culture”—and the authors point to the many instances of cultural, economic and social connections. There's a focus on two phenomena: the participation by Jews in European musical culture, and the creation of new Jewish musical artifacts that resulted from a fusion of the two cultures.
Scroll to Top
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap