EMAg Features

Making Art and the Fight for Freedom

Making Art and the Fight for Freedom

Loren Ludwig
You might not know his name but you've seen his picture. Bayard Rustin, a luminary in the Civil Rights movement, also performed and recorded early music and collected historical instruments at the dawn of New York's early-music revival.
We're Living in Taruskin's World

We’re Living in Taruskin’s World

Thomas Forrest Kelly
MUSINGS: Richard Taruskin's approach to music as an essential part of society, culture, and politics will forever affect our thinking. "I remember being consulted by the publisher about the advisability of publishing 'Text and Act,' and remember advising then not to publish..."
Girl Just Wanna Have Fun

Girl Just Wanna Have Fun

Aaron Keebaugh
With pop-star flair, violinist Aisslinn Nosky has shown vitality across her career. For her latest high-profile project, a complete Mozart violin concerto cycle, she traveled through rarely performed Haydn—an unusual journey for most violinists, but in perfect keeping with the H&H approach.
Rhinestones & Nashville Twang

Rhinestones & Nashville Twang

John Pitcher
The versatility of Nashville’s historically informed musicians has made them flexible, even delightfully heretical, in their approach to performing early music. It's a scene that has been ebbing, flowing, and growing for nearly 20 years.
How Did Early Music Get So 'Crispy'?

How Did Early Music Get So ‘Crispy’?

Addi Liu
Like playing bingo, you can find "crisp" in countless early-music reviews, although such a term isn't found in the historical record. Are musicians looking for uniformly "crisp" playing while neglecting other sonic possibilities? What's going on here?
Enjoying the Ride with Countertenor John Holiday

Enjoying the Ride with Countertenor John Holiday

David Shengold
The countertenor's commitment to early music remains solid, even as the larger entertainment world has discovered his unique talents. You sense that Holiday's intense desire to communicate informs his cabaret act as much as his Baroque opera.
Art of the Amateur: A Computer Programmer Uploads a Lifetime of Renaissance Music

Art of the Amateur: A Computer Programmer Uploads a Lifetime of Renaissance Music

Ashley Mulcahy
If you’ve ever sung or played a madrigal from an edition on IMSLP, you’ve probably engaged with the work of Allen Garvin, whose International Music Score Library Project corpus surpassed two thousand uploads last year. 
Viols to Virginia, Music in Colonial America

Viols to Virginia, Music in Colonial America

Loren Ludwig
The only known extant works for viola da gamba in British Colonial America are found in the James River Music Book, a manuscript that has resided in Virginia since the 1730s and contains 15 works for solo viola da gamba, among other musical items. The earliest layer of the JRMB holds music by Lully, Purcell, and Handel, nearly doubling the page count of surviving instrumental music from the period and contributing repertoire for viola da gamba, organ, harpsichord, violin, and voice to the music now known to have been played in colonial Virginia. This article was first published in the May 2020 issue of EMAg.
William Christie on the American Scene

William Christie on the American Scene

Thomas May
In February, William Christie came to New York as part of his annual residency with the Juilliard School’s Historical Performance program. He noticed a sea change in attitude on the American scene toward the study of historically informed practice.
Women Composers and the Risks of Authorship

Women Composers and the Risks of Authorship

Rebecca Cypess
Celebrating International Women's Day: The careers of Viennese composer Marianna Martines and Roman composer Maria Rosa Coccia mirrored one another in key respects. But the differences are fascinating, and revealing: While one was born into privilege and carefully cultivated her public image, the other seemed to suffer from fewer social connections and a more bold approach to her public persona.
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